The Events Leading up to the Shooting

The Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino gunman checked into the Mandalay Bay on September 25, 2017. He was booked into room 32-135, at which time he complained to his casino host that he wanted to be booked into at a room ending in 235, per his prior request. The hotel could not accommodate him, and thus he stayed in room 32-235. The room was provided to him complimentary because he was a frequent high-end gambler at the casino.

Four days later, the gunman requested and was granted permission to also check into room 32-134, which was connected to room 32-135, via connecting doors. Both suites overlooked the Route 91 Harvest music festival, which was an open-air, outdoor event.

The music festival was a three-day event being held from September 29 through October 1 at the Las Vegas Village concert venue, which is a 15 acre site located 490 yards from the gunman’s window.

The View of the Music Festival from the Gunman’s Suite 32-135.

During the period September 25 through October 1, the gunman brought twenty-three assault rifles and more than 6,000 rounds of ammunition through the hotel lobby, up a hotel service elevator, and into his room. The ammunition was a combination of hollow point and polymer tipped hollow point ammunition, plus Tracer, Frangible Incendiary, Armor Piercing, and Armor Piercing Incendiary ammunition. Additionally, he carried to the room firearm related items such as scopes, tripods, and bump stocks.

On September 30, more than 24 hours before he began his massacre, the shooter placed a “Do Not Disturb” sign on his suite doors, and no longer permitted anyone to enter his room, including housekeeping services.

The Events Leading up to the Shooting

The Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino gunman checked into the Mandalay Bay on September 25, 2017. He was booked into room 32-135, at which time he complained to his casino host that he wanted to be booked into at a room ending in 235, per his prior request. The hotel could not accommodate him, and thus he stayed in room 32-235. The room was provided to him complimentary because he was a frequent high-end gambler at the casino.

Four days later, the gunman requested and was granted permission to also check into room 32-134, which was connected to room 32-135, via connecting doors. Both suites overlooked the Route 91 Harvest music festival, which was an open-air, outdoor event.

The music festival was a three-day event being held from September 29 through October 1 at the Las Vegas Village concert venue, which is a 15 acre site located 490 yards from the gunman’s window.

The View of the Music Festival from the Gunman’s Suite 32-135.

During the period September 25 through October 1, the gunman brought twenty-three assault rifles and more than 6,000 rounds of ammunition through the hotel lobby, up a hotel service elevator, and into his room. The ammunition was a combination of hollow point and polymer tipped hollow point ammunition, plus Tracer, Frangible Incendiary, Armor Piercing, and Armor Piercing Incendiary ammunition. Additionally, he carried to the room firearm related items such as scopes, tripods, and bump stocks.

On September 30, more than 24 hours before he began his massacre, the shooter placed a “Do Not Disturb” sign on his suite doors, and no longer permitted anyone to enter his room, including housekeeping services.

The Key Events of the Shooting

At approximately 9:20 p.m. on October 1, Mandalay Bay Security Officer Jesus Campos was dispatched to various hotel rooms to investigate several Hotel Service Optimization System alarms. One room he was directed to inspect was located on the 32nd floor at room 32-129. Mandalay Bay Hotel security was notified of this alarm at 8:40 p.m. Campos attempted to access the room shortly before 10:00 p.m.

After responding to one of the alarms in a room on the 30th floor, Campos attempted to access the 32nd floor from the stairwell entrance, but was unable to open the door from the stairwell into the hallway. Campos then climbed the stairs to the 33rd floor, and rode a guest elevator to the 32nd floor. There he discovered that an L-shaped bracket had been screwed onto the door and door frame, which prevented the door from opening.

Utilizing the foyer house phone, he notified the security dispatch center of the issue. Dispatch then notified the engineering department who requested that Engineer Stephen Schuck investigate the situation.

After hanging up the phone, Campos heard what he described as a “rapid drilling sound” coming from room 32-135. He began approaching the room when he heard automatic gunfire. Campos was then struck in the left calf by the fragment of a bullet. Campos took cover in the alcove of rooms 32-122 and 32-124 and utilized both his cellular phone and radio to notify dispatch he was shot.

By this time, Schuck was entering the floor to fix the barricaded door reported by Campos. Schuck began walking down the hallway when he heard rapid gunfire. He then saw Campos who told him to take cover. Schuck stepped into an alcove and gunfire again erupted down the hallway coming from room 32-135.

The View of Suite 32-135 from the Hallway.

The gunman had used a small sledgehammer to break two of the windows in his suites and began shooting through them at 10:05 p.m. He ultimately fired more than 1,000 rounds onto the festival audience, located approximately 490 yards away. The gunfire continued, with momentary pauses, over the span of ten minutes and ended at 10:15 p.m.

At 11:20 p.m., police breached room 32-135 utilizing explosives, and found the gunman on the floor dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Inside rooms 32-134 and 32-135, the officers found twenty-three assault rifles and more than 6,000 rounds of ammunition.

The View Inside Suite 32-135.

The Key Events of the Shooting

At approximately 9:20 p.m. on October 1, Mandalay Bay Security Officer Jesus Campos was dispatched to various hotel rooms to investigate several Hotel Service Optimization System alarms. One room he was directed to inspect was located on the 32nd floor at room 32-129. Mandalay Bay Hotel security was notified of this alarm at 8:40 p.m. Campos attempted to access the room shortly before 10:00 p.m.

After responding to one of the alarms in a room on the 30th floor, Campos attempted to access the 32nd floor from the stairwell entrance, but was unable to open the door from the stairwell into the hallway. Campos then climbed the stairs to the 33rd floor, and rode a guest elevator to the 32nd floor. There he discovered that an L-shaped bracket had been screwed onto the door and door frame, which prevented the door from opening.

Utilizing the foyer house phone, he notified the security dispatch center of the issue. Dispatch then notified the engineering department who requested that Engineer Stephen Schuck investigate the situation.

After hanging up the phone, Campos heard what he described as a “rapid drilling sound” coming from room 32-135. He began approaching the room when he heard automatic gunfire. Campos was then struck in the left calf by the fragment of a bullet. Campos took cover in the alcove of rooms 32-122 and 32-124 and utilized both his cellular phone and radio to notify dispatch he was shot.

By this time, Schuck was entering the floor to fix the barricaded door reported by Campos. Schuck began walking down the hallway when he heard rapid gunfire. He then saw Campos who told him to take cover. Schuck stepped into an alcove and gunfire again erupted down the hallway coming from room 32-135.

The View of Suite 32-135 from the Hallway.

The gunman had used a small sledgehammer to break two of the windows in his suites and began shooting through them at 10:05 p.m. He ultimately fired more than 1,000 rounds onto the festival audience, located approximately 490 yards away. The gunfire continued, with momentary pauses, over the span of ten minutes and ended at 10:15 p.m.

At 11:20 p.m., police breached room 32-135 utilizing explosives, and found the gunman on the floor dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Inside rooms 32-134 and 32-135, the officers found twenty-three assault rifles and more than 6,000 rounds of ammunition.

The View Inside Suite 32-135.

The Immense Loss

Fifty-eight innocent people were killed, which included 36 women and 22 men, ranging in age from 20 to 67, with an average age of 38. Seven individuals were from Nevada, 33 were from California, 14 were from other states, and 4 were from Canada.

An additional 851 people were physically injured, 422 with gunshot wounds.

Thousands have suffered long-term emotional harm, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

The incident is the deadliest mass shooting in United States history.

The Immense Loss

Fifty-eight innocent people were killed, which included 36 women and 22 men, ranging in age from 20 to 67, with an average age of 38. Seven individuals were from Nevada, 33 were from California, 14 were from other states, and 4 were from Canada.

An additional 851 people were physically injured, 422 with gunshot wounds.

Thousands have suffered long-term emotional harm, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

The incident is the deadliest mass shooting in United States history.

The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Preliminary Investigative Report

To access the complete Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Preliminary Investigative Report issued January 18, 2018, click on the below image.

The New York Times Timeline of Events

The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Preliminary Investigative Report

To access the complete Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Preliminary Investigative Report issued January 18, 2018, click on the below image.

The New York Times Timeline of Events